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(c) 2016 Jon L Gelman, All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Why Are Children Working in American Tobacco Fields?

Child Labor prohibitions are enforced through workers' compensation acts. Unfortunately that is an inefficient enforcement mechanism. Today's post was shared by Steven Greenhouse and comes from www.thenation.com

Young farm workers are falling ill from “green tobacco sickness” while the industry denies it and government lets it happen.



This article was reported in partnership with the Investigative Fund of the Nation Institute.

The air was heavy and humid on the morning the three Cuello sisters joined their mother in the tobacco fields. The girls were dressed in jeans and long-sleeve shirts, carried burritos wrapped in aluminum foil, and had no idea what they were getting themselves into. “It was our first real job,” says Neftali, the youngest. She was 12 at the time. The middle sister, Kimberly, was 13. Yesenia was 14.
Their mother wasn’t happy for the company. After growing up in Mexico, she hadn’t crossed the border so that her kids could become farmworkers. But the girls knew their mom was struggling. She had left her husband and was supporting the family on the minimum wage. If her girls worked in the tobacco fields, it would quadruple the family’s summer earnings. “My mom tends to everybody,” Neftali says. This was a chance to repay that debt.
The sisters trudged into dense rows of bright green tobacco plants. Their task was to tear off flowers and remove small shoots from the stalks, a process called “topping and suckering.” They walked the rows, reaching deep into the wet leaves, and before long their clothes were soaked in the early morning dew. None of them knew that the dew represented a...
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