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Thursday, May 22, 2014

Ship Breaking - Unsafe Working Conditions on the Beaches of Bangladesh

Today's post comes from guest author Kit Case, from Causey Law Firm.
Today's post was shared by Kit Case and comes from www.gCaptain.com.

Cargo Ships on Beaches…Really?

By On August 30, 2013
A perspective on ship recycling and how to end beaching 
Like most other things, ships don’t last forever. After 25-30 years they are no longer commercially usable and therefore taken out of service to be dismantled. The materials are recycled to a lesser or greater extent – since a large cargo vessel may consist of 20-40,000 tons of steel, they clearly have a market value as steel scrap.
The vast majority of ships are taken to India, Pakistan or Bangladesh to be scrapped on the beach. There is something quite wrong with that.  People in flip flops on beaches are OK. But people on beaches wearing flip flops and no safety gear while taking apart massive cargo ships with hand tools is simply wrong.
Unsurprisingly, ship breaking is one of the most dangerous industries. According to the EU Commission, it is six times more likely to die at work in the Indian shipbreaking industry than in the Indian mining industry, and according to a recent report from Sustainalyitics, 1,000 people died in the Bangladesh ship breaking industry over a 10 year period.
[Read the rest of the article...]
Photo: Shipbreaking at Alang. Photo: IMO, via www.gCaptain.com