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Showing posts sorted by relevance for query quebec. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query quebec. Sort by date Show all posts

Friday, February 5, 2010

Quebec's The Selling of Asbestos Called "Immoral"

The Montreal Gazette has called for a ban on the sale of asbestos. Asbestos continues to be  mined in Quebec.

Asbestos is a long known carcinogen causally related to asbestos, lung cancer and  mesothelioma (a rare and fatal disease.) A major effort has been underway internationally to ban asbestos as the epidemic of asbestos disease continues to be rampant.  Injured workers and their families have inundated workers' compensation system throughout the US highlighting insufficiencies in the system to provide adequate benefits and straining the traditional tort system.

In an editorial the paper stated, "The day should be long gone when a civilized society such as Quebec's knowingly sells a carcinogenic substance - asbestos - to a poorer, developing country such as India."" In an interview with an Indian publication in December, New Democratic Party MP Pat Martin said, 'Asbestos and tobacco are the two industries where the industry knows well it is killing people, but it survives by junk science and aggressive lobbying of politicians.'"

"A coalition of more than 100 scientific experts from 28 countries sent a letter to Charest [Quebec's Premier] last week, on the eve of his trade-mission visit to India, pointing out that Quebec is facing an uspurge of asbestos-related illness. Asbestos is to blame, the province's workers' compensation board says, in 60 per cent of the 104 cases of Quebec workers who died from work-related causes in a seven-month period last year."



Thursday, April 14, 2011

Quebec Does the Dirty Deed - Funds Asbestos Production

After years of controversy, the Quebec government has agreed to give $7.5 million dollars to Jeffrey Mine so that they can dig up more asbestos and spread the cancer causing agent throughout the world. This repugnant and unconscionable action is nothing less than immoral

"Reopening the Jeffrey Mine will create 425 full-time jobs in Asbestos," the minister said.  Yes this will definitely a job creation bill, in the saddest way possible. It would also require massive amount of medical teams to treat asbestos victims throughout the world, as Quebec exports this poison worldwide.  

It is time that asbestos was banned worldwide. Yes, the United States should show by example!


For over 3 decades the Law Offices of Jon L. Gelman  1.973.696.7900  jon@gelmans.com have been representing injured workers and their families who have suffered asbestos related disease.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Asbestos Ban In Canada Gets Boast - Parti Quebecois Wins Election!

 "...the Parti Quebecois (PQ) said this week that, if it's elected, it would cancel a $58-million loan Quebec's Liberal government approved to help reopen the Jeffrey Mine, one of Canada's last asbestos mines."

Click here to read:
Quebec separatists win election, say TV networks

Read more about the battle to Ban Asbestos in Canada
Feb 18, 2010
The Canadian Journal of Medicine had also endorsed a ban on Canadian asbestos production. "Canada's government must put an end to this death-dealing charade. Canada must immediately drop its opposition to placing ...
Aug 01, 2011
Our northern neighbor, Canada. Asbestos has not been mined in the US since 2002. The US imports 99% of the asbestos it consumed from Canada. In fact the US consumed 1,040 metric tons in 2010 which was an increased ...
Sep 05, 2011
The documentary, directed by Ontario filmmaker Kathleen Mullen, is “a personal investigation into the continued use of asbestos” and details her father's tragic death due to exposure to asbestos from Canadian mining.
Dec 11, 2011
To this day there is no asbestos ban in effect in the US. The Canadian asbestos industry still exports asbestos fiber used in the US and other parts of the world. On Thursday, The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization ...

Sunday, June 13, 2010

Quebec to Resuscitate Its Asbestos Industry

Despite a public outcry and world wide outrage, the Quebec government is now poised to infuse the Province's idle asbestos mining industry with financial support to bring it back to life.  The Montreal Gazette reports that the cabinet of Quebec Premiere Jean Charest's cabinet is about to approve a $58 Million loan to activate the Jeffry Mine in Asbestos, Quebec. The mine has been idle since 2002. Asbestos is a known carcinogen that has been causally linked to lung cancer and mesothelioma, a rare and fatal malignancy. Hundreds of thousands of claims have been filed against the asbestos industry for direct liability. Verdicts continue to be reported in record number in cases filed by asbestos victims and their families. While asbestos use has been banned in many countries, Canada and the United States have yet to ban is use.  Click here to read more about asbestos related disease and claims for benefits. For over 3 decades the Law Offices of Jon L. Gelman1.973.696.7900 jon@gelmans.com  has been representing injured workers and their families who have suffered asbestos related illnesses.

Friday, June 24, 2011

Canada Called A Pariah State

Canada's activities at the UN Rotterdam Convention to prevent the listing of chrysotile asbestos as a carcinogen has been internationally denounced. Despite the knowledge of the deadly effects of asbestos fiber, Canada continues to encourage the mining of the asbestos for its pecuniary gain in Quebec.


Related articles

The Ugly Canadians

Today, Canada blocked the United Nations from banning asbestos. Reuters reported, "Chrysotile asbestos will not be listed as a hazardous industrial chemical that can be banned from import after countries including Canada and Ukraine blocked consensus."

An editorial in the Toronto Star called the action by Canada as hypocritical: 

"The hypocrisy is staggering. The federal government has spent millions to clear its own buildings of this noxious material — including taking it out of 24 Sussex Drive to protect the Prime Minister and his family. Canadian companies, schools and homeowners have also removed asbestos from their structures. Yet we happily export it.The asbestos industry in Quebec has been dying for years and employs only about 300 people. There’s no future in these operations. The miners should be given help to find new jobs or a decent pension and the mines left to wither away. This toxic trade needs to end."

"Asbestos kills. The World Health Organization calls it “one of the most serious occupational carcinogens” and notes that it’s a factor in 90,000 deaths each year. But we keep selling more than $100 million of it each year to countries such as India and Indonesia, where it is used in the manufacture of cement and auto parts. We even market it with a Canadian flag logo, leaving the impression it is stamped with government approval."

***

"The asbestos industry in Quebec has been dying for years and employs only about 300 people. There’s no future in these operations. The miners should be given help to find new jobs or a decent pension and the mines left to wither away. This toxic trade needs to end."

As the Canadian Globe and Mail posted today, "We are the Ugly Canadians."

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Rail Company Involved in Quebec Explosion Files for Bankruptcy

Today's post was shared by WCBlog and comes from www.nytimes.com

BANGOR, Me. — The railroad company whose runaway oil train caused a fire and explosion that killed 47 people in a small town in Canada filed for bankruptcy protection on Wednesday.

The company — Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway — filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in United States and Canadian courts, citing debts to more than 200 creditors after the July disaster in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec.

The company chairman, Ed Burkhardt, said previously that a bankruptcy filing was likely after service disruptions because its rail line remained closed in Lac-Mégantic. The company, based in Hermon, Me., also faces lawsuits and enormous cleanup costs related to the disaster.

The parked train, with 72 tankers full of crude oil, was unattended when it began rolling toward town, eventually derailing downtown. Several tankers exploded, destroying 40 buildings in the lakeside town of 6,000 residents.

[Click here to see the rest of this article]

Sunday, February 23, 2014

Detroit Files Financial Restructuring Plan

Today's post was shared by WSJ Law Blog and comes from blogs.wsj.com

DETROIT—The city of Detroit submitted its financial restructuring plan to federal court Friday, a move likely to set off a new round of jockeying among creditors asked to take a haircut in the nation’s largest municipal bankruptcy.

The plan seeks to restructure an estimated $18 billion in long-term obligations by paying secured creditors in full, paying pension funds a reduced amount, and giving other unsecured creditors just a fraction—about 20 cents on the dollar—of the outstanding debt the city still owes.

“There is still much work in front of all of us to continue the recovery from a decadeslong downward spiral,” Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr said in a statement Friday. “We must move swiftly to emerge from bankruptcy so that the financial distress harming the City can end.”

As part of the plan, city officials said they would set aside $1.5 billion over 10 years for capital improvements, blight removal, and equipment and technology upgrades to make the city safer, cleaner and more efficient. Up to $500 million of that will be dedicated to blight removal over the next five years, officials said. Read the full WSJ story here.

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, who steered the city into a bankruptcy filing in July, called on many city creditors who have been reluctant to settle to reconsider.

“Let’s use this plan as a call to action for a voluntary settlement as part of the mediation process to resolve the...

[Click here to see the rest of this post]
….

Jon L. Gelman of Wayne NJ is the author NJ Workers’ Compensation Law (West-Thompson) and co-author of the national treatise, Modern Workers’ Compensation Law (West-Thompson). For over 4 decades the Law Offices of Jon L Gelman  1.973.696.7900  jon@gelmans.com  have been representing injured workers and their families who have suffered occupational accidents and illnesses.

Read more about "Bankruptcy and Workers' Compensation"
Jan 18, 2014
Public entity bankruptcies have placed the stability of workers' compensation and other benefits into a grey area. As the Detroit bankruptcy resolution continues to stumble the consistency necessary for critical benefit delivery ...
Dec 03, 2013
The "nuclear option" for a workers' compensation claim is a public entity bankruptcy and Detroit got the Court's approval to go forward with the legal maneuver. Over the course of the last 3 decades, bankruptcy has become a ...
Jul 19, 2013
The bankruptcy of the city of Detroit reflects not only an economic and social tragedy for America, but it also marks a failure of basic disability and compensation programs for the US workers. It is a sentinel event marking the ...
Aug 13, 2013
The company — Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway — filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in United States and Canadian courts, citing debts to more than 200 creditors after the July disaster in Lac-M├ęgantic, Quebec.


Thursday, February 18, 2010

Canadian Asbestos Hypocrisy

Despite the fact that asbestos is a know cancer producing agent, Quebec liberals have won their battle to continue asbestos mining. In 2008 asbestos amounted to a $100 Million dollars business in Canada. Canada exports the majority of its asbestos to developing counties which amounts to 175,000 tons per year. 


Over 100 scientists from 28 nations had written a letter in support of a ban on asbestos production in Canada.  “We appeal to you to respect the overwhelmingly consistent body of scientific evidence and the considered judgment of the World Health Organization (WHO) that all forms of asbestos have been shown to be deadly and that safe use of any form of asbestos has proven impossible anywhere in the world,” the letter began. “Under Canadian law, chrysotile asbestos is classified as a hazardous substance, but the Quebec government has successfully lobbied to prevent it being recognized as such under international environmental law, thus creating a double standard of protection as if some lives were less deserving of protection than others.”


The Canadian Journal of Medicine had also endorsed a ban on Canadian asbestos production. "Canada's government must put an end to this death-dealing charade. Canada must immediately drop its opposition to placing chrysotile under the Rotterdam Convention's notification and consent processes and stop funding the Chrysotile Institute. More importantly, Canada should do its part in alleviating the global epidemic of asbestos-related disease by ending the mining and export of chrysotile, as the WHO recommends."


Asbestos causes multiple diseases including: asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma. For decades US victims of asbestos related disease have sought benefits under the workers' compensation system from employers. They have also filed claims under the civil justice system against suppliers, manufacturers and distributors of asbestos products. Due to the latency of the disease from exposure to manifestation, despite the reduction in the use of asbestos fiber, the disease continues to be very prevalent in the US and throughout the world.


Click here to read more about efforts to ban asbestos production in the US.

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Scientific improprieties in the asbestos industry funded research of McGill professor

Asbestos research, and its validity, is a much debated quesstion. Today's post is shared from Kathleen Ruff, RightOnCanada.ca
Here is a powerful, detailed and damning scientific analysis of  improprieties in the research of Prof. J.C. McDonald on Quebec asbestos miners – The Past is Prologue, Universities in Service to Corporations: The McGill-QAMA Asbestos Example.
This analysis was presented by Prof. David Egilman at the McGill asbestos conference on October 1, 2013. It is clearly presented and well worth reading. At the conference, no response was provided to the damning information that Prof. Egilman put forward.
Prof. McDonald’s research was financed with one million dollars by the Quebec Asbestos Mining Association (QAMA). Prof. McDonald used his research to promote the use of chrysotile asbestos around the world. His research continues today to be used by the global asbestos industry to promote the sale and use of chrysotile asbestos. It was used, for example, by the global asbestos lobby at the May 2013 Rotterdam Convention conference to help defeat the listing of chrysotile asbestos as a hazardous substance.
McGill continues to state that Prof. McDonald’s research was conducted “according to the rigorous scientific standards for which McGill is known”. McGill has not however addressed the detailed and damning evidence that Prof. Egilman has put forward.
Prof. Egilman and other scientists have called on McGill to carry out an...
[Click here to see the rest of this post]

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Asbestos Used by Brake Workers Linked to Malignant Mesothelioma

A recent study published in the Annals of Occupational Hygiene finds that exposure to chrysotile asbestos fiber manufactured by a friction materials factory, Raybestos Manhattan Inc., was causally to malignant mesothelioma, a rare and fatal disease. This appears to be consistent with the association previously established among Quebec asbestos miners and at a South Carolina asbestos textile factory. 


Raybestos Manhattan formerly had many frictional materials plants in operation throughout the US. One facility was located in Passaic NJ. That plant closed in June of 1975. Hundreds of workers' compensation claims were filed by the former workers who suffered from illnesses as a result of the exposure to asbestos fiber. Claims were also filed against the manufacturers and distributors of asbestos products including the asbestos mines in Quebec. 


Annals of Occupational Hygiene, doi:10.1093/annhyg/meq046 


Click here to read more about asbestos related disease and claims for benefits. For over 3 decades the Law Offices of Jon L. Gelman 1.973.696.7900 jon@gelmans.com  have been representing injured workers and their families who have suffered asbestos related illnesses.

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Distinguished Author About Asbestos Dangers Seeks to Save His Archives

Paul Brodeur, author of many articles concerning the dangers of environmental hazards including asbestos, and the award winning book, Outrageous Misconduct-The Asbestos Industry on Trial, is fighting with the New York City Public Library to save his research. A recent article in  The New York Times describes that the library will not return all of Brodeur's materials.

Brodeur, the former investigative reporter for The New Yorker magazine, donated his research to the library 18 years ago. The library recently reviewed the material, and only wishes to keep some, and not all, of the boxes of materials that Brodeur donated. When Brodeur requested that the entire collection be kept intact, but the NY library offered to return only what it declined to accept, and if not taken back will destroy the remaining items. 

For over 3 decades the Law Offices of Jon L. Gelman  1.973.696.7900  jon@gelmans.com have been representing injured workers and their families who have suffered asbestos exposures.

Monday, September 5, 2011

Asbestos: ADAO to Livestream the film -- Breathtaking


Kathleen Mullen’s Documentary Gives Comprehensive Insight into the Tragedy Associated with Commercial Mining

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO,) which combines education, advocacy, and community to provide a unified voice for asbestos victims, today announced that it will be livestreaming Breathtaking on September 26th. The documentary, directed by Ontario filmmaker Kathleen Mullen, is “a personal investigation into the continued use of asbestos” and details her father’s tragic death due to exposure to asbestos from Canadian mining.

Breathtaking addresses the asbestos industry through a moving and personal investigation into the death of Mullen’s father, and the baffling present-day use, pubic mining, and incessant export of asbestos in spite of decades of scientific evidence that asbestos kills people. Commercially mined since the Industrial Revolution, asbestos was nicknamed the ‘magic mineral’ for its fabric-like, and fire retardant properties and has been used in everything from brake pads to oven mitts. Although it has been discovered to be carcinogenic, and asbestos use has been banned in many countries and limited in others. However, Canada, Russia and several other countries, still mine asbestos and export it for use in developing nations.

Mullen uses heartbreaking clips of her dying father’s legal testimony, together with family photos, and home movies to take the audience on an investigative journey. From her family home in British Columbia to Quebec, India and Detroit, Mullen paints a global, yet still personal picture of the many lives affected by the continued use of asbestos.

“As I began Breathtaking, everyone to whom I mentioned I was making the film responded with a personal story of their own,” Mullen says. “I soon realized that this story was a lot bigger than just my own family’s grief.”

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) recognizes the global and negative impact of the Canadian asbestos industry and has partnered with Mullen to hold a first-ever, international livestreaming of Breathtaking on September 26th, 2011 at 6:30 pm EST from the ADAO website.

The 45 minute screening will begin with a short introduction from Mullen and conclude with a thirty minute question and answer session via Twitter with the filmmaker and ADAO President and Co-Founder, Linda Reinstein.

“ADAO is thrilled to be able to bring this critical issue to the forefront through the incredible film,Breathtaking. It is through the new avenues of digital technology and social media that we are seeing awareness about asbestos hazards expand rapidly around the globe,” said Reinstein about the livestreaming event.


Click Here To View Trailer: http://tinyurl.com/4yznj99

For over 3 decades the Law Offices of Jon L. Gelman  1.973.696.7900  jon@gelmans.com have been representing injured workers and their families who have suffered occupational accidents and illnesses.

Wednesday, May 4, 2011

Fallen Asbestos Workers Honored at a Memorial Mass

The Trentonian (Trenton, NJ) reports on a memorial mass held at Saint Joachim Church honoring union members who died from asbestos related illnesses as a result of their occupational exposure to asbestos fiber. This was the 8th Annual Memorial Mass held by Insulators Local No. 89.

Fred Dumont, Business Manager of the union said, "The harmful effects of asbestos insulation were hidden by manufacturers and distributors, because they were making such enormous profits...."

Asbestos exposure is causally related to asbestosis, as well as lung cancer, and a rare but fatal carcinoma, mesothelioma.



Related articles

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Benzodiazepine use and risk of Alzheimer’s disease: case-control study

Objectives To investigate the relation between the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and exposure to benzodiazepines started at least five years before, considering both the dose-response relation and prodromes (anxiety, depression, insomnia) possibly linked with treatment.

Design Case-control study.

Setting The Quebec health insurance program database (RAMQ).

Participants 1796 people with a first diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and followed up for at least six years before were matched with 7184 controls on sex, age group, and duration of follow-up. Both groups were randomly sampled from older people (age >66) living in the community in 2000-09.

Main outcome measure The association between Alzheimer’s disease and benzodiazepine use started at least five years before diagnosis was assessed by using multivariable conditional logistic regression. Ever exposure to benzodiazepines was first considered and then categorised according to the cumulative dose expressed as prescribed daily doses (1-90, 91-180, >180) and the drug elimination half life.

Results Benzodiazepine ever use was associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (adjusted odds ratio 1.51, 95% confidence interval 1.36 to 1.69; further adjustment on anxiety, depression, and insomnia did not markedly alter this result: 1.43, 1.28 to 1.60). No association was found for a cumulative dose <91 prescribed daily doses. The strength of association increased with exposure density...


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Saturday, September 15, 2012

Canada Concedes Asbestos is Dangerous-Now It Needs to Ban Asbestos Entirely

Canada's Industry Minister announced yesterday that the country would finally concede to international pressure and label asbestos that it exports as a health hazard. Now Canada, and the United States, need to take the next step and impose a universal ban against the use and sale of asbestos products.

Asbestos is a known carcinogen and causally related to mesothelioma and lung cancer. For decades asbestos was mined and exported from the Province of Quebec.

Click here to read Ottawa does U-turn on asbestos mining (Globe & Mail)

Read More About "Ban Asbestos"
Sep 04, 2012
The Canadian Journal of Medicine had also endorsed a ban on Canadian asbestos production. "Canada's government must put an end to this death-dealing charade. Canada must immediately drop its opposition to placing .
20 hours ago
Asbestos Ban In Canada Gets Boast - Parti Quebecois Wins Election! Sep 04, 2012. The Canadian Journal of Medicine had also endorsed a ban on Canadian asbestos production. ... The US has yet to ban asbestos .
Aug 06, 2012
The US Geological Survey has reported that US consumption of asbestos fiber increased 13% in 2011. Asbestos is a known carcinogen and the cause of mesothelioma, a rare and fatal cancer. The US has yet to ban asbestos ...
21 hours ago
A recent report associates asbestos exposure at work to a higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease . ... Asbestos Ban In Canada Gets Boast - Parti Quebecoi... Clint Eastwood at the 2012 ...
Related articles

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Facebook Disclosure for 87 Class Action Plaintiffs? Federal Court Denies Discovery Request

Social media accounts are evidential to determine the credibility of the a party in a workers' compensation claim. Take it one step further and they can also be a factor in determining deviation from employment. Today's post was shared by WCBlog and comes from p.ost.im

Social media accounts, typically Facebook, are currently a hot-button issue for plaintiff ESI production in civil litigation. Most courts (but not all!) require a threshold showing that the public account has relevant information that would lead to discoverable evidence before requiring a plaintiff to produce private portions of the account.

In an order dated July 19, 2013 in the case of Jewell v. Aaron’s, Inc., Civil No. 1:12-CV-0563-AT (N.D.Ga. 2013), 87 opt-in plaintiffs are suing their employer for, among other claims, not allowing certain lunch breaks as required by law. The defendants sought, among their discovery requests:
“All documents, statements or any activity available that you posted on any internet Web site or Web page, including, but not limited to, Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn, Twitter, or a blog from 2009 to the present during your work hours at Aaron’s store.”

Tuesday, March 4, 2008

NJ Workers' Compensation Carriers Win a "Get Out of Jail Card" on Asbestos Liability Claims

Workers' compensation insurance companies have a long history of guarding themselves from liability from asbestos exposure issues. Recently the NJ courts have ruled that workers' compensation insurance companies are shielded from liability when the insurance company performs hygiene studies and does not take action to protect the employees that it has insured under the policy. This ruling further limits the ability of asbestos victims to obtain benefits.

The court in Fackelman v Lac d'Amiante du Quebec, LTEE, et al ruled on that workers' compensation carriers are shielded from liability for failing to notify workers of known hazards on the job site and take efforts to correct them. An asbestos victim worked at the Owens-Corning plant in Berlin NJ for 10 months as a stripper of Kaylo, asbestos pipe covering. The ambient air conditions were described as "dusty" and "foggy" in the plant. His employer provided no information to the employee about presence of high levels of asbestos fiber and a mask was not required to be worn. Air testing was conducted by the workers' compensation insurance carrier, but the employees were not informed as to the results nor the hazards of asbestos fiber. The employee was diagnosed with asbestosis in 2002.

Between 1958 and 1972 Aetna insurance company conducted air testing at the plant. The testing revealed that asbestos in the air (10,000,000 parts per cubic foot) at the plant far exceeded the minimal standards then in place. Aetna had meetings with Owens and discussed with Owens Corning, the employer, what actions should be taken to improve the industrial environment.

The asbestos worker filed a civil action against Aetna for failing to warn the employees of the hazardous conditions and for its failure to minimize the exposure to a safe level at the Owens Corning plant. The Court dismissed the case and did not extent third party liability against the workers' compensation carrier. The court reasoned that there was no surrender of responsibility to maintain a safe workplace from the employer to the insurance carrier. The court also held that there was no common law liability for an insurance carrier did not have a duty "to reduce the risks of exposure or to warn the employees directly."

The long history of the involvement of the insurance industry with the asbestos industry has been memorialized in depositions and affidavits for decades. The conspiracy of silence has lead to premature and needless and agonizing deaths of those who have been exposed to asbestos fiber. NJ has been reported to have one of the highest rates of asbestos related disease in the US. That should be no surprise since it is the legacy of the State's enormous rate of asbestos production during the war years and shortly thereafter.

The NJ compensation system for the payment of benefits to asbestos victims is stagnant. The recent legislation to provide benefits from the "Uninsured Employers Fund" has been ineffective in moving the cases along and adequately compensating asbestos victims. The civil litigation system has been bogged down in bureaucratic bankruptcies. Hopefully the NJ Legislature will see fit to review this inequitable situation and provide the speedy and remedial benefits to asbestos victims.